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 "I just have to tell you how much I appreciate your help in straightening out my Vertigo.  I was in sad shape when I came in and by three visits I was better! You're a miracle worker!"

 M.C.

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Congratulations to Elevate Physical Therapy & Pain Center Inc on being the on top Physical Therapist in Brevard ranking of 2015.
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Arm Pain

 

Proximal Humerus Fractures

 

    Most humerus fractures occur at the proximal (end closest to the shoulder) end of the bone. The fractures result from traumatic injuries such as a fall or a vehicle accident. Immediate attention is required with this injury in order to maintain complete function of the shoulder joint. Some humerus fractures require surgical intervention to reset the bone and attach hardware to help with healing. Other humeral fractures will heal correctly without surgical intervention. It is best to consult your orthopedic surgeon to make this decision.

 

    Symptoms of a humeral fracture include pain, swelling, bruising, severely restricted movement of the shoulder, numbness and tingling throughout the extremity, and deformity of the upper arm. If surgery is required, symptoms afterward will include pain, swelling, lack of strength and range of motion, and possible numbness around the incision site.

 

    Physical therapists will use modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises, and education for safe return to function.

 

Biceps Tendinitis

 

    Biceps tendinitis is a common injury to the shoulder. Inflammation occurs at the long and short head attachments of the biceps muscle at the front of the shoulder. Most cases result from overuse of the shoulder, weakness of the rotator cuff, tightness in the shoulder joint, poor body mechanics, an abrupt increase in exercise routine, and age-related body changes.

 

    Symptoms of biceps tendinitis include pain in front of the shoulder during use of the arms, tenderness during palpation of the area, radiating pain into the neck or down the arm, dull pain following activity, weakness of the shoulder joint, catching and clicking sensations, and difficulty with activities of daily living.

 

    Physical therapy is a great adjunct for a quick recovery! Therapists use modalities to decrease pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening/stretching exercises, and education for safe return to prior function.

 

   

 

Biceps Rupture

 

    A biceps rupture occurs when the biceps muscle pulls away from the bone. Men are affected more than women. Due to wear and tear of the biceps muscle, the injury typically occurs between the ages of 40 and 60 years old. The biceps muscle attaches at the shoulder and the elbow. At the shoulder, the muscle splits into two tendons: long head and short head. Though this injury typically occurs at the shoulder, the tendon can also rupture at the elbow.

 

    When a biceps rupture occurs, symptoms include sharp pain in the upper arm or elbow, hearing a pop or snap at the shoulder or elbow, bruising or swelling in the upper arm or elbow, weakness, tenderness to palpation, muscle spasms in the shoulder or arm, and a bulge in the lower part of the upper arm.

 

    In most cases, this injury can be treated with physical therapy. Therapists utilize modalities to decrease pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises, and education for safe return to prior level of function. If the injury leads to long-lasting symptoms that affect the function of the arm, surgical intervention may be required to repair the rupture.

 

Elbow Pain

 

Elbow Bursitis

 

    Elbow (olecranon) bursitis is a condition that involves swelling at the tip of the elbow. This condition can be symptomatic or asymptomatic (no symptoms). Elbow bursitis typically occurs from direct trauma to the elbow or pressure to the elbow for long periods of time. Thus, individuals who suffer from this condition are typically students or office workers.

 

    Symptoms of elbow bursitis include swelling at the tip of the elbow, redness at the tip of the elbow, pain during palpation or when pressure is applied to the elbow, and stiffness in the elbow.

 

    Physical therapists treat elbow bursitis with modalities to decrease pain and swelling, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Elbow Fracture

 

    Elbow fractures can occur in any of the three bones that make up the elbow: humerus, radius, or ulna. There are three types of fractures that can occur:

 

  • Type 1 (nondisplaced): the bone breaks, but is still in its normal position

  • Type 2: a fragment of bone is shifted from its normal position

  • Type 3: multiple breaks of the bone

 

Type 1 and 2 fractures are treated without surgery, but type 3 will require surgery to realign the bone fragments. Fractures can take 2-8 weeks to heal depending on the person’s health prior to the injury. During this time, very little stress will be placed on the affected bone.

 

    Symptoms of an elbow fracture include moderate to severe pain that worsens with moving the arm, tightness and cramping in the arm, swelling and redness in the area of the fracture, a grinding or catching sensation in the elbow, deformity in the affected area, tenderness with palpation of the area, and numbness in the affected area.

 

    Physical therapists will utilize modalities to decrease swelling and pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior function. In surgical cases, extensive education will be provided on protocols to allow for correct healing of the bones.

 

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)

 

    Medial epicondylitis is an inflammation/irritation to the tendons on the inside of the forearm. This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive motions such as swinging a golf club or activities that require throwing and twisting. Most of the pain occurs at the medial epicondyle, the inside bony prominence of the elbow, due to the tendon attachments on the inside of the elbow.

 

    Symptoms of medial epicondylitis include pain along the inside of the forearm with movement, pain or numbness that radiates into the hand and fingers, tenderness and swelling along the forearm, weakness of the forearm, and stiffness in the elbow.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

 

    Lateral epicondylitis is an inflammation/irritation to the extensor tendons on the outside of the forearm. This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive gripping, twisting or carrying objects. Most of the pain occurs at the lateral epicondyle, the outside bony prominence of the elbow, due to the tendon attachments on the outside of the elbow.

 

    Symptoms may result gradually or instantly. They include pain that radiates into the forearm and wrist, difficulty with common tasks such as turning a doorknob or holding a coffee cup, difficulty gripping objects, increased pain when using the wrist and hand, stiffness in the elbow, and weakness in the forearm, wrist and hand.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Medial Apophysitis (Pitcher’s Elbow)

 

    Medial apophysitis is an inflammation/irritation to the inside portion of the elbow where the humerus (upper arm bone) meets the ulna (one of the forearm bones). This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive throwing motions. It typically affects pitchers in baseball/softball of all genders and ages.

 

    Symptoms of pitcher’s elbow include gradually worsening pain in the elbow with throwing motions, lingering soreness in the elbow following throwing motions, swelling and tenderness in the elbow, loss of speed when throwing the ball, loss of speed, accuracy, and distance when throwing the ball, muscle cramping in the forearm, loss of motion of elbow, and discomfort with performing activities of daily living requiring forearm use.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to decrease swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

   

 

Shin and Calf Pain

 

Calf Strain

 

    A calf strain is an injury to the muscles in the calf area (the back of the lower leg below the knee). This injury can occur with high speed motions like running and jumping or any forceful or uncoordinated movements. Calf strains occur in three different grades:

 

  • Grade 1: mild or partial stretch or tearing of the muscle fibers. Calf is sore but walking is not impacted.

  • Grade 2: moderate stretch or tearing of a greater percentage of muscle fibers. Calf is painful and weak leading to limping when walking.

  • Grade 3: severe or complete tear of the muscle fibers. Walking is very difficult.

 

Symptoms of calf strains include sharp pain and weakness in the back of the leg, throbbing/sharp pains with standing and walking, tightness in calf, muscle spasms in leg, sharp pain when moving the ankle, and a popping sound at the time of injury (only with Grade 3 strains).

 

Physical therapists utilized modalities to reduce pain and swelling, manual therapy to reduce adhesions in muscle tissue and improve range of motion, strengthening/stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

 

 

Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (Shin Splints)

 

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) is a condition that causes pain on the inside of the shin (the front part of the leg between the knee and the ankle). It typically affects athletes of all genders and ages due to stress placed on the shin muscles during running and jumping. The most common causes for shin splints include flattening of the arch of the foot in standing, running and jumping activities, excessive hip range of motion, smaller calf girth in males, and a high body mass index.

 

    Symptoms of shin splints include pain along the inside of the shin with all movements of the lower extremities. It can also be tender to palpation.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to reduce pain and inflammation, manual therapy to reduce adhesions in the muscle tissue and improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.