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 "I just have to tell you how much I appreciate your help in straightening out my Vertigo.  I was in sad shape when I came in and by three visits I was better! You're a miracle worker!"

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Congratulations to Elevate Physical Therapy & Pain Center Inc on being the on top Physical Therapist in Brevard ranking of 2015.
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Hand and Wrist Pain

 

    Hand and wrist pain can be debilitating due to the everyday, necessary use of our upper extremities during activities of daily living, occupational tasks, and hobbies. Overuse syndromes and injuries to the bones and tendons are common in the hand and wrist. But, the symptoms can be easily reduced with education of correct wrist positioning during tasks, rest, gentle strengthening and stretching, and use of modalities such as heat and ice to reduce pain and inflammation provided by licensed physical therapists and physical therapist assistants at Elevate Physical Therapy. Here, our physical therapists work diligently to get you back into a pain-free life.

 

Arthritis

    Two main types of arthritis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, can be present in the hand and wrist joints. Osteoarthritis (OA) results from a breakdown of cartilage, a rubbery substance between bones, which leads to the bones rubbing together. The cause of OA is unknown, but possible factors include overuse of the joints due to occupational tasks, sports, and previous injuries. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that results in pain and inflammation of the joints. It affects approximately 1% of the United States population. The cause is unknown, but is believed to be related to genetic tendencies and hormones. Thus, women are more likely to develop this disease than men.

    Symptoms of arthritis are as follows: redness/inflammation surrounding the joints, stiffness in the joints following prolonged periods of inactivity, pain during activity that is relieved by rest, abnormal joint “noises” such as cracking and crunching, pain when you press on the joint, and increased bone growth around the joint that you may be able to feel.

Here at Elevate Physical Therapy, our treatments would involve light strengthening and stretching exercises, gentle manual therapy to improve range of motion, and modalities for pain relief and improved circulation provided by skilled physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.

   

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    The carpal tunnel is a narrow channel on the palm side of your wrist that houses the median nerve and the tendons that bend your fingers. Due to professions and activities that position your wrist in excessive extension, a lot of pressure is put on the median nerve. This pressure can cause carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

    Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome include feeling “pins and needles” or numbness into the palm and fingers, weakness of the hand that contributes to dropping items you are holding, and discomfort throughout the wrist and hand.

    Whether you choose to treat CTS conservatively or surgically, physical therapy can help with symptom elimination and giving you a better quality of life. Our qualified physical therapists and physical therapist assistants will educate you in proper strengthening and stretching exercises, provide pain relief through comfortable modalities, and help you assess your home and workplace for appropriate modifications to allow for correct wrist positioning.

 

 

De Quervain’s Tendinitis

 

    De Quervain’s tendinitis, also known as texting thumb or gaming thumb, is a prevalent condition for individuals of all ages. This inflammatory condition affects the extensor tendons of the thumb and wrist, abductor pollicus longus and extensor pollicus brevis, that are encased in the De Quervain tunnel at the wrist. With overuse and repetitive activities, the extensor tendons can become inflamed and swollen resulting in difficulty gliding through the De Quervain tunnel.

 

    Common symptoms of De Quervain’s tendinitis include localized pain/inflammation at the base of the thumb, difficulty pinching or grasping objects with the thumb, discomfort with wrist movements such as side to side and twisting, and difficulty flexing the thumb.

 

    Once your physical therapist confirms the diagnosis of De Quervain’s tendinitis by performing the Finkelstein test, a gentle stretch of the thumb extensor tendons that produces pain, education will be provided for gentle strengthening and stretching exercises and modalities will be performed for pain relief. Symptoms, in most cases, are quickly resolved following a few physical therapy treatments.

 

   

 

Wrist Fracture

 

    Wrist fractures, breaks or cracks in bones of the wrist, are one of the most common fracture sites in individuals of all ages and genders. Injury typically occurs from falling with an outstretched arm. The most frequently fractured bone is the radius, a bone on the thumb side of your wrist. There are three types of fractures:

 

  1. Type 1: nondisplaced - bone is broken but is still in the normal position

  2. Type 2: a fragment of bone is shifted from its normal position

  3. Type 3: multiple breaks of the bone or bones. Usually requires surgery.

 

    Common symptoms of wrist fractures include localized pain and swelling in the affected area, tenderness when palpating the affected area, and difficulty with movement. Strengthening and stretching exercises, manual therapy to improve range of motion, and modalities to improve pain and reduce swelling are utilized during physical therapy by skilled physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.

 

Wrist Tendinitis

 

    Wrist tendinitis refers to the early stages of tendon inflammation and irritation. This condition strongly correlates with repetitive use of the wrist. Most commonly, wrist tendinitis affects athletes, computer users, factory workers, etc. However, as we age, tendinitis can occur due to loss of elasticity in the wrist tendons.

 

    When the tendons become irritated and inflamed, symptoms can include pain in the wrist/hand that can radiate up to the elbow, pain with putting pressure on the wrist such as pushing up from a chair, tenderness with palpation of the wrist, stiffness, and swelling. Symptoms are quickly relieved with skilled physical therapy sessions to address strength/flexibility impairments, pain, and education of correct positioning of the wrist during household and occupational activities to reduce strain of the tendons.

 

 

 

Arm Pain

 

Proximal Humerus Fractures

 

    Most humerus fractures occur at the proximal (end closest to the shoulder) end of the bone. The fractures result from traumatic injuries such as a fall or a vehicle accident. Immediate attention is required with this injury in order to maintain complete function of the shoulder joint. Some humerus fractures require surgical intervention to reset the bone and attach hardware to help with healing. Other humeral fractures will heal correctly without surgical intervention. It is best to consult your orthopedic surgeon to make this decision.

 

    Symptoms of a humeral fracture include pain, swelling, bruising, severely restricted movement of the shoulder, numbness and tingling throughout the extremity, and deformity of the upper arm. If surgery is required, symptoms afterward will include pain, swelling, lack of strength and range of motion, and possible numbness around the incision site.

 

    Physical therapists will use modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises, and education for safe return to function.

 

Biceps Tendinitis

 

    Biceps tendinitis is a common injury to the shoulder. Inflammation occurs at the long and short head attachments of the biceps muscle at the front of the shoulder. Most cases result from overuse of the shoulder, weakness of the rotator cuff, tightness in the shoulder joint, poor body mechanics, an abrupt increase in exercise routine, and age-related body changes.

 

    Symptoms of biceps tendinitis include pain in front of the shoulder during use of the arms, tenderness during palpation of the area, radiating pain into the neck or down the arm, dull pain following activity, weakness of the shoulder joint, catching and clicking sensations, and difficulty with activities of daily living.

 

    Physical therapy is a great adjunct for a quick recovery! Therapists use modalities to decrease pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening/stretching exercises, and education for safe return to prior function.

 

   

 

Biceps Rupture

 

    A biceps rupture occurs when the biceps muscle pulls away from the bone. Men are affected more than women. Due to wear and tear of the biceps muscle, the injury typically occurs between the ages of 40 and 60 years old. The biceps muscle attaches at the shoulder and the elbow. At the shoulder, the muscle splits into two tendons: long head and short head. Though this injury typically occurs at the shoulder, the tendon can also rupture at the elbow.

 

    When a biceps rupture occurs, symptoms include sharp pain in the upper arm or elbow, hearing a pop or snap at the shoulder or elbow, bruising or swelling in the upper arm or elbow, weakness, tenderness to palpation, muscle spasms in the shoulder or arm, and a bulge in the lower part of the upper arm.

 

    In most cases, this injury can be treated with physical therapy. Therapists utilize modalities to decrease pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises, and education for safe return to prior level of function. If the injury leads to long-lasting symptoms that affect the function of the arm, surgical intervention may be required to repair the rupture.

 

Elbow Pain

 

Elbow Bursitis

 

    Elbow (olecranon) bursitis is a condition that involves swelling at the tip of the elbow. This condition can be symptomatic or asymptomatic (no symptoms). Elbow bursitis typically occurs from direct trauma to the elbow or pressure to the elbow for long periods of time. Thus, individuals who suffer from this condition are typically students or office workers.

 

    Symptoms of elbow bursitis include swelling at the tip of the elbow, redness at the tip of the elbow, pain during palpation or when pressure is applied to the elbow, and stiffness in the elbow.

 

    Physical therapists treat elbow bursitis with modalities to decrease pain and swelling, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Elbow Fracture

 

    Elbow fractures can occur in any of the three bones that make up the elbow: humerus, radius, or ulna. There are three types of fractures that can occur:

 

  • Type 1 (nondisplaced): the bone breaks, but is still in its normal position

  • Type 2: a fragment of bone is shifted from its normal position

  • Type 3: multiple breaks of the bone

 

Type 1 and 2 fractures are treated without surgery, but type 3 will require surgery to realign the bone fragments. Fractures can take 2-8 weeks to heal depending on the person’s health prior to the injury. During this time, very little stress will be placed on the affected bone.

 

    Symptoms of an elbow fracture include moderate to severe pain that worsens with moving the arm, tightness and cramping in the arm, swelling and redness in the area of the fracture, a grinding or catching sensation in the elbow, deformity in the affected area, tenderness with palpation of the area, and numbness in the affected area.

 

    Physical therapists will utilize modalities to decrease swelling and pain, manual therapy to increase range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior function. In surgical cases, extensive education will be provided on protocols to allow for correct healing of the bones.

 

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)

 

    Medial epicondylitis is an inflammation/irritation to the tendons on the inside of the forearm. This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive motions such as swinging a golf club or activities that require throwing and twisting. Most of the pain occurs at the medial epicondyle, the inside bony prominence of the elbow, due to the tendon attachments on the inside of the elbow.

 

    Symptoms of medial epicondylitis include pain along the inside of the forearm with movement, pain or numbness that radiates into the hand and fingers, tenderness and swelling along the forearm, weakness of the forearm, and stiffness in the elbow.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

 

    Lateral epicondylitis is an inflammation/irritation to the extensor tendons on the outside of the forearm. This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive gripping, twisting or carrying objects. Most of the pain occurs at the lateral epicondyle, the outside bony prominence of the elbow, due to the tendon attachments on the outside of the elbow.

 

    Symptoms may result gradually or instantly. They include pain that radiates into the forearm and wrist, difficulty with common tasks such as turning a doorknob or holding a coffee cup, difficulty gripping objects, increased pain when using the wrist and hand, stiffness in the elbow, and weakness in the forearm, wrist and hand.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to reduce swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.

 

Medial Apophysitis (Pitcher’s Elbow)

 

    Medial apophysitis is an inflammation/irritation to the inside portion of the elbow where the humerus (upper arm bone) meets the ulna (one of the forearm bones). This condition occurs from overuse with repetitive throwing motions. It typically affects pitchers in baseball/softball of all genders and ages.

 

    Symptoms of pitcher’s elbow include gradually worsening pain in the elbow with throwing motions, lingering soreness in the elbow following throwing motions, swelling and tenderness in the elbow, loss of speed when throwing the ball, loss of speed, accuracy, and distance when throwing the ball, muscle cramping in the forearm, loss of motion of elbow, and discomfort with performing activities of daily living requiring forearm use.

 

    Physical therapists utilize modalities to decrease swelling and pain, manual therapy to improve range of motion, strengthening and stretching exercises to improve function, and education for safe return to prior level of function.